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The 4-Hour Body

Metadata

  • Author: [[Timothy Ferriss]]

Highlights

ENGINEERING THE PERFECT NIGHT’S SLEEP — location: 4984 ^ref-38373


Taking too long to get to sleep (“onset” insomnia, my major problem) • Waking too often throughout the night (“middle” insomnia) • Waking too early and being unable to get back to sleep (“terminal” insomnia) — location: 5002 ^ref-20549


Good sleep (8–10) was most dependent on the ratio of REM-to-total sleep, not total REM duration. — location: 5050 ^ref-52146


I could increase REM percentage by extending total sleep time past nine hours, or by waking for five minutes approximately four and a half hours after sleep onset. — location: 5053 ^ref-3956


Taking 200 milligrams of huperzine-A 30 minutes before bed can increase total REM by 20 –30%. — location: 5056 ^ref-61009


Ever wonder how you can sleep 8–10 hours and feel tired? The likely culprit: low blood sugar. — location: 5066 ^ref-10232


If you can’t control the ambient temperature, testing socks of different thicknesses is the easiest variable to change for tweaking heat loss. — location: 5079 ^ref-5308


EAT A LARGE FAT- AND PROTEIN-DOMINATED MEAL WITHIN THREE HOURS OF BEDTIME. — location: 5081 ^ref-38134


The basic premise of polyphasic sleep is that the most beneficial phase of sleep is the REM phase. Normal sleepers experience REM for a mere 1–2 hours per night. To reap the benefits of polyphasic sleep, we’ll need to engineer things so that REM is a much higher percentage of total sleep. — location: 5197 ^ref-2353


Rule #1: It’s not what you put in your mouth that matters, it’s what makes it to your bloodstream. If it passes through, it doesn’t count. — location: 814 ^ref-7391


Rule #2: The hormonal responses to carbohydrates (CHO), protein, and fat are different. — location: 821 ^ref-33574